The Link Between Oral Health and Diabetes

The link between oral health and diabetes may be stronger than you think.  A recent study from the School of Dentistry, University of Michigan provides a brief summary of the scientific evidence for the often two-way links between hyperglycemia and oral health. 

The Link Between Oral Health and Diabetes

Diabetes occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to create insulin, or when the body can’t make good use of the insulin it does create.

Not being able to produce insulin or use it effectively can lead to serious health problems.  Studies have shown it’s the leading cause of new cases of adult blindness, loss of lower limbs not trauma-related, kidney malfunction and gum disease. 

How is Diabetes Related to Gum Disease?

Gum disease or Periodontal disease is a serious infection of the gums that can damage the soft tissue and destroy the bone that supports your teeth. 

People who have gum disease may experience higher levels of plaque and bacteria causing chronic inflammation, bleeding, pus, tooth loss and bone loss. The plaque found on your teeth is home to more than 300 different species of bacteria.

Periodontal disease, though common, is largely preventable. The leading causes for gum disease are poor oral hygiene and/or a serious medical condition such as diabetes.  

How Do I Watch for Gum Disease?

Schedule regular appointments and cleanings to ensure bacteria is not building up under the gum line. This is extremely important for people who have diabetes and will benefit greatly from a healthy, clean and infection-free mouth. 

And to help prevent gum disease, your daily routine should include brushing and flossing at least twice a day and/or after every meal. 

How Can My Dentist Help?

People who have diabetes are more prone to gum disease because of a compromised immune system.  If gum disease goes untreated, infections can set in, making blood sugar levels rise and harder to control, even with blood sugar medicines.  A dentist will be able to diagnose gum disease in the early stages to prevent the condition from becoming serious.  

Please call Dr. Abeyta at (505) 293-7611, or Contact us by email, to schedule your New Patient Experience with Dr. Abeyta.  Her team is honored to partner with you in caring for your oral and overall health.